Monastery of Santa María de Oseira

San Cristovo de Cea, Spain

Monastery of Santa María de Oseira became a monastery of the Cistercian order in 1141, an order of French monks sent by Saint Bernard of Clairvaux. The monks left in 1835 forced to leave by the government policies, abandoning it. They returned in 1929, this time being a community of Cistercians of the Strict Reform - commonly called Trappists. The monastery is popular stopping point on the pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostella.

The church was built between c.1200 and c.1239 AD. It is considered a landmark of Romanesque architecture in the Spanish peninsula. Its design was inspired by other pilgrimage churches. The main chamber is known as the 'palm tree room' and boasts a dome which is supported by four columns. It also possesses a Lapidarium: a collection of stone pieces obtained during the restorations and excavations. The buildings are in process of restoration by the state & monastic community. The monastery is a major state monument, and open to visitors.

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Founded: 1137-1141
Category: Religious sites in Spain

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