Lugo Cathedral

Lugo, Spain

Saint Mary's Cathedral in Lugo was erected in the early 12th century in a Romanesque style, with Gothic, Baroque and Neoclassicist elements.

A church existed in the site from 755. In 1129 Bishop Peter III commissioned a new edifice in the latest architectural style from Raimundo, a local architect and builder. This Romanesque structure was completed in 1273.

Later renovations and restorations added elements in other styles, such as the Renaissance retablo at the high altar. It was destroyed in the 1755 Lisbon earthquake and fragments of it are housed in the church.

Architecture

The cathedral has a Latin Cross structure, with a length of 85 m. It has a nave, covered by a barrel vault, and two aisles, with an ambulatory and five apse chapels. The triforium features triple ogival mullioned windows. The apse houses a calvary sculpture from an unknown date.

The façade is a Renaissance design by Julián Sánchez Bort inspired by a plan proposed by Ventura Rodríguez for the Cathedral of Pamplona. Its construction was finished in the late 19th century, with the completion of the two side towers.

The northern entrance's narthex is in Gothic style, dating to 1510-1530. Internally showing a starred vault, it is formed by three archivolts with a lintel showing Christ Pantocrator and with a pinjante (glove-shaped decorative pendant) that features a depiction of the Last Supper.

To the right of the entrance is the Gothic Torre Vella (bell tower), surmounted by a Renaissance top floor finished by Gaspar de Arce in 1580. The sacristy (1678) and the cloister (1714) are in the Baroque style, as is the central chapel of the triforium (1726). The chapel of St. Froilán is in Renaissance style, dating to the 17th century. Notable is the choir, built by Francisco de Moure (early 17th century).

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Address

Praza Santa María 1, Lugo, Spain
See all sites in Lugo

Details

Founded: 1129
Category: Religious sites in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mark Auchincloss (13 months ago)
Beautiful Romanesque Catedral dating back to 1129. With later mainly Baroque style additions. Museum worth visiting. It's 5€ to enter including visit of Bell Tower. During Mass you can sneak in for free. 8n front of main facade there's the entrance to the Roman walls of the city & it's impressive, elevated walkway.
Mindaugas T (2 years ago)
Amazing cathedral! Very very beautiful. Adoration of Holy Sacrament takes all day long (24 hours)! Audioguides in different languages. Museum and many interesting things you can find here. Discounts for pilgrims.
Rolland K (2 years ago)
It is a sight to behold and splendid in every way. It's certainly one of the best I've ever seen. The museum section is very well done and extremely informative. The only disappointment was not being able to get a clear view of the nave. Entrance is relatively cheap at €5 per adult. It's a must-see when one is in the area.
David Le Hunte (2 years ago)
An interesting visit with audio tour. The only real disappointment was that it was impossible to get to a location to get the full view of the magnificent altar that you see in the photos.
Juan Gimeno (2 years ago)
Very friendly and relaxing place to hang out with family... just amazing history and Architecture
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