Monastery of San Paio de Abeleda

Castro Caldelas, Spain

The Monastery of San Paio de Abeleda is a medieval monastery built in the 12th century located 2 km from Abeleda village. Today found in a state of ruins, it was originally one of the most influential monastic centres in the province and was converted into an abbey surviving until the 19th century Ecclesiastical Confiscations of Mendizábal. It was acquired by the House of Alba in 1872.

The church was built in the Romanesque style in the 12th century (with further alterations later). In plan it takes the form of a Latin cross. It consists of a single nave with 3 wings separated by pointed arches with archivolts decorated with chequered imposts and the capitals are adorned with flowers and chimeras. Traces of the original paint on the capitals, which had been maintained for several centuries, still remain visible today. The church was greatly reformed during the 16th century however a door from the 13th or 14th century was preserved. The main altar dates to the 17th century.

The facade of the cloister is in the Gothic style, and features a quatrefoil Gothic arch.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

3.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Pilar Fidalgo (2 years ago)
It is in a very beautiful area, but it is a pity that it is in ruins
Luis A (2 years ago)
It's a shame that I'm so abandoned
Raquel Palomino Urbina (2 years ago)
It is a pity that a little bit is not invested in improving accesses and recovering the building.
Jose Luis Martin Martinez (2 years ago)
Difficult to access, but with a touch of charm and mystery. Ruined
Jesús xx (3 years ago)
Cargado de historia pero demasiado abandonado
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