Regional Archeological Museum Antonio Salinas

Palermo, Italy

The Regional Archeological Museum Antonio Salinas possesses one of the richest collections of Punic and Ancient Greek art in Italy, as well as many items related to the history of Sicily. Formerly the property of the Oratory of Saint Philip Neri, the museum is dedicated to Antonio Salinas, a famous archaeologist and numismatist from Palermo. It is part of the Olivella monumental complex, which includes the Church of St. Ignatius and the adjoining Oratory.

Collections

On the ground floor, a section is dedicated to the artefacts found underwater, including materials that were part of the cargo of vessels, stone anchors, strains of lead, lamps, amphoras and inscriptions ranging from the culture of the Phoenicians to that of the Romans.

The Phoenician section displays two large anthropomorphic sarcophagi of the fifth century BC from the necropolis of Pizzo Cannita (near modern Misilmeri). There are also sculptures of gods and Phoenician votive stelae from Mozia and Lilybaeum.

A reconstruction of the east pediment of the archaeological site of Selinunte is exhibited, displaying the Gorgon of Temple C, several metopes with mythological reliefs (Temples C and E) and sculptures of the archaic and classical period. In 1823, two British architects, Samuel Angell and William Harris, ventured to excavate at Selinunte in the course of their tour of Sicily, and came upon many fragments of sculptured metopes from the Archaic temple now known as “Temple C.” Although local officials tried to stop them, they continued their work, and attempted to export their finds to England, destined for the British Museum. Now in the shadow of the activities of Lord Elgin, Angell and Harris’s shipments were diverted to Palermo, where they remain to this day in the Archaeological Museum.

Artifacts from Himera are on display, as well as objects and sculptures from Solunto, Megara Hyblaea, Tindari, Kamarina and Agrigento. Among the most important works of art are the great Ram bronze of the third century BC from Syracuse, a Roman copy of a sculpture by Lysippus depicting Heracles catching the Ceryneian Hind and a Roman copy of a marble statue by Praxiteles depicting a satyr.

The Roman period is documented by a collection of sculptures and mosaics found in villas from Piazza Vittoria in Palermo, where the center of the Roman city was previously located. Even prehistoric cultures present in the caves around the territory of Palermo are exhibited in the museum.

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Details

Founded: 1866
Category: Museums in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Andrew Scholtz (5 months ago)
The exhibits on archaic Selinunte, especially "Temple C," are amazing.
Federica Piazzi (5 months ago)
This museum is absolutely stunning. The collection includes some unique pieces and the way they are displayed is really amazing. The museum is undergoing restoration and they're doing a great job with the exhibition design and lighting. It is currently possible to visit the ground floor only. I was a bit taken aback by a member of the personnel that basically kicked me out 20 minutes before the closing time because he had decided that he was going to close early as "no one was there". Besides that I really enjoyed my visit.
Peter Claydon (5 months ago)
The main door to the museum has no sign on it. The website said it was open, but it was closed, and with no information when you get there it's impossible to work out if/when it will be open. The clue that it is the door to the museum is a smaller door about 10 metres away proclaiming it's the door to the museum office. Based on other reviews and the guide books it seems worth going along and checking, but don't plan your day around it being open.
Kuala Bound (5 months ago)
The entrance statue was gorgeous with papyrus surrounding it ....not like now. I used the plants of the background fountain to make it look a bit like it was. For this period they let visit only ground floor so entrance fee is reduced to 3 euro.
MrH Altius (2 years ago)
Only the first floor is currently open (at a discounted rate) but really nice artifacts nicely displayed. Unlike other local museums, this one has comprehensible English placards for foreign guests. Audio tours available too. If you like history /archeology, you'll enjoy a visit here.
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