Diana Archaeological Park

Lipari, Italy

The Archaeological Park of Lipari is located at the Diana district. In the park there are the remains of walls for a length of about 50 m, a tower of the 4th century BCE and some Roman fortifications built by Sextus Pompey.

Behind the Greek walls there are buildings of the Imperial-Roman period (2nd century AD). Within the walls there is a street with some home facades of the Imperial-Roman period, mainly located under the modern town and the traces of the town destroyed by the eruption of the 8th century BC. Beyond the walls there was the necropolis and few remains have been discovered. Near the northern entrance of the Park and the Archbishop’s Palace there are the remains of funerary monuments of the late Roman Imperial period and tombs of the 1st century BC.

In the same area there are walls built during the late Roman Imperial period which goe beyond the Via della Conciliazione, partially detached from the Park. San Calogero are the oldest thermal baths of the ancient world and they date back to the final stage of the Culture of Capo Graziano (between the end of the 16th and the beginning of the 15th century).

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Details

Founded: 4th century BCE
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Italy

More Information

www.sicilyforall.com

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Davide Russo (14 months ago)
Found by chance walking through Lipari
Reiner Sobota (2 years ago)
An admirable place :-)
Carlotta De Cooman (2 years ago)
Inside the walls there are the remains of dwellings and funerary monuments, including hypogeum vaulted tombs of the Roman Imperial Age, built on the Greek necropolis and equipped with underground vaults and niches containing urns.
Alain GOUEDO (2 years ago)
Very interesting
neeyma stella (2 years ago)
Interesting
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