Sanctuary of Tindari

Tindari, Italy

The Sanctuary of Tindari was built on the ruins of the Tindari Castle in 1953 and contains the famous statue of the Black Madonna. This statue of Byzantine origins is dated back to 800 AD, and was carved from a rare Turkish cedar wood. The legends tell that the ship carrying this Madonna was driven onto the Tindari bay after a violent storm.

According to popular belief, the Black Madonna has a miraculous power which protects Sicilians from many dangers including earthquakes, pestilence, and the attacks of armies.Today the Black Madonna stands behind the altar.

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Details

Founded: 1953
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

www.sicily.co.uk

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Anne-Marie (2 years ago)
Breathtaking views of the Aeolian islands and the Gulf of Patti! Pity about all the untidy stalls nearby selling candied fruit and souvenirs. Detracts somewhat from the overall experience. Tourist office agent was extremely helpful and indicated to us all the interesting points of interest. Sanctuary with the Madonna Nera is definitely worth visiting. There is a long trail downwards from the car park to the beach surrounded by the typical Sicilian scrub, prickly pears (fichi d'India) and cactus plants. Not an easy trek under a hot sun!
PaulKing5621 (2 years ago)
The church was nice even the view outside
Christy Sharon Awendo (2 years ago)
Beautiful,fantastic view , and the church Is stunning . It has a historic story behind It it's worth a tour . Very organizzed .
Szilárd Barna (2 years ago)
Stunning temple, gorgeous location, you can wall but busses takes you up also. Absolutely loved it.
Akhil Varghese (2 years ago)
Such an amazing place wonderful experience beautiful church and surroundings
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