Lipari Cathedral

Lipari, Italy

Lipari Cathedral has been since 1986 a co-cathedral in the Archdiocese of Messina-Lipari-Santa Lucia del Mela. From its foundation, the cathedral had served as the sole parish church for the entire archipelago.

The first cathedral was built in the heart of the acropolis, where a Greek temple had probably existed in the classical period, but it was destroyed by the Arabs in 838.

Reconstruction came only under Roger I of Sicily. In 1083, Count Roger I invited the Benedictine monks who were well-fitted for the serenity and security of the place, and built a monastery near the castle for them. The Abbot Ambrogio and his Benedictines built the church and its neighbouring monastery in Lipari. In 1131, Ugone, Archbishop of Messina, promoted the two monasteries of Patti and Lipari to a bishopric, in accordance with a papal bull.

Next to the single naved church, the monastery developed around the cloisters, the first Latin-Norman style cloisters in Sicily. Three of the four original ambulatories were recently brought to light, the fourth has been incorporated into the cathedral and is now its right nave.

The building was expanded between 1450 and 1515 with an artistic trussed wooden ceiling, but was burnt in July 1544 after an attack by the Ottoman corsair Hayreddin Barbarossa. In 1516 Charles V inherited an array of Spanish titles including naples, Sardinia and Sicily and led a campaign against Barbarossa, who retreated to Africa in 1535. After that, reconstruction work began in Lipari: fortifications of the citadel were improved, the cathedral was rebuilt with barrel vaults as a living symbol of the Islanders' Christian faith.

In the course of the eighteenth century frescos with biblical scenes were painted on the vaults. In 1728, the silver statue of the patron Bartholomew was created, as well as the wooden altar to the left of the apse. Between 1755 and the end of the century, work was begun on the campanile. In 1772 the cathedral was expanded with two side naves. The right side nave incorporated the north ambulatory of the cloisters. Work also began on the facade of pale Vesuvian stone in 1772, intended to give a delicate contrast and sense of dynamic harmony with the interior of the duomo. In the last decades of the eighteenth century, marble altars decorated with paintings by Antonio Mercurio were added. In 1859 the cathedral was struck by lightning, destroying the gable of the facade and the causing some vaults to collapse. Repair work began immediately and was completed in 1861. The lost ceiling paintings have never been restored.

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Address

Via Castello 39s, Lipari, Italy
See all sites in Lipari

Details

Founded: 1131
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Roberto Sciarrone (3 months ago)
Wonderful cathedral, in what was the first human settlement in Lipari and the only inhabited area until the Spanish period, located within the museum complex of the Castle of Lipari.
Valeria Palermo (3 months ago)
Breathtaking view from the fortress. In the center of Lipari, 5 min on foot (uphill though) to enjoy a wonderful view, a castle, the cathedral, archaeological excavations and an archaeological museum.
Dan M (9 months ago)
Not amazing like many other Italian Cathedrals such as Milano Duomo, or Firenze, but still beautiful.
Robertas S. (13 months ago)
Beautiful Church of Saint Bartholomew, located in Lipari Castle complex.
Mario Dell`Anno (17 months ago)
The site is really very interesting. It is a castle in which there is a beautiful archaeological and geological museum that explains the history and geological evolution of the islands that make up the archipelago. The cathedrals are very beautiful. One has once completely frescoed which is worth consulting carefully, the other has been used to show scenes and history of the films that were filmed on the islands of the archipelago. There are many of them but "Il postino" with Massimo Troisi stands out.
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