Milazzo Castle

Milazzo, Italy

The Castello di Milazzo is located on the summit of a hill overlooking the town, on a site first fortified in the Neolithic era. The castle was built as a result of the strategic importance of the Milazzo peninsula, which commands the Gulf of Patti, the body of water that separates Sicily from the Aeolian Islands. It also commands one of Sicily's most important natural harbours.

The Greeks modified it into an acropolis, and it was later enlarged into a castrum by the Romans and Byzantines. 

In around 843, the Arabs began to build a castle on the ruins of the Greek, Roman and Byzantine fortifications. The castle's keep possibly dates back to this era. The castle was enlarged by the Normans and Swabians. It was extensively modified during the reign of Frederick II of Hohenstaufen.

Between 1496 and 1508, the Aragonese built walls with six semi-circular bastions, encircling the original medieval castle. Between 1525 and 1540, the Spanish built bastioned fortifications around the Aragonese walls and the settlement which surrounded it, expanding the castle into a citadel. The new fortifications were designed by the military engineers Pietro Antonio Tomasello and Antonio Ferramolino. Some outworks were added in the 17th century. Several civil buildings began to be built within the walls of the castle, including the old cathedral and various palaces.

The castle was in Habsburg hands in the first half of the 18th century, before being taken over by the Bourbons. The latter retained the castle until they lost Milazzo to Giuseppe Garibaldi in 1860. The castle was subsequently converted into a prison in 1880, and underwent a number of alterations. The prison closed in 1959 and the castle remained abandoned for a couple of decades.

It is now in good condition, and open to the public.

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Details

Founded: 9th century AD
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Dave Cosi (2 months ago)
Beautiful old castle with a fantastic view over Milazzo and the coast. Well restored facilities, clean. Must see when you are in Milazzo for a stop over.
Aleksandar Jovanović (2 months ago)
Very interesting place with a rich history. Now it contains two museums, an art gallery, old prison and some breathtaking views of Milazzo
Eliza Farrugia (3 months ago)
Beautiful historic castle situated in a magnificent point of Milazzo. Very well kept and just 5 euro to go in. The views from the castle are breathtaking. Make sure not to miss if you're in the vicinity!
Martin Yuill (9 months ago)
Impressive castle sadly it was closed on our visit but wonderful place just look at from outside the walls
Mikhail Bratus (Zabuyaki) (10 months ago)
Very big and nice set of castle buildings. Some things do not work or have to be removed again. Despite all of these issues the castle is worth visiting. You will be able to make many aerial photos from the castle walls.
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