Ekornavallen

Broddetorp, Sweden

Ekornavallen is one of the richest prehistoric sites in Sweden. The earliest burials were made in the Neolithic period, 3000 BC. The 20 meters wide and two meters high burial mound is dated to Bronze Age (1800-500 BC). There are also lot of different kind of settings (like standing stones and stone circles) from the Iron Ages built between 0-500 AD.

The largest, and best known, of the Neolithic passage graves at Ekornavallen is one called the Girommen which according to early writers means the giant oven. It consists of sandstone slabs, but the mound which once covered the grave is entirely gone. Between the lower passage and the chamber proper lies a very large and thick slab, the "Key stone", resting on the passage stones. The grave was restored in the 1940s when a fragment of a chisel, some amber slivers and some ornate potsherds were found.

 

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Details

Founded: 3000 BC - 500 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Sweden
Historical period: Neolithic Age (Sweden)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

nidal hamdan (4 years ago)
Something special about it
Anden120 (4 years ago)
Beautiful landscape with old tombstones used as decoration for memorial/ grave places. Kind and friendly animals to say hello to aswell!
Jim Peterson (6 years ago)
Very cool
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