Skara Cathedral

Skara, Sweden

Skara Cathedral is the seat for the bishop of the Church of Sweden Diocese of Skara. It is also one the largest churches in Sweden. The history of cathedral is traced from the 11th century and it was inaugurated as a cathedral around 1150. The current appearance is from the 13th century. The current Gothic design dates to the 1886-1894 restoration under the leadership of architect Helgo Zettervall. The furnishings are unique and include the Soop Mausoleum and Bo Beskow´s handsome glass mosaic window.

The church has a medieval crypt that was found in 1949 after having been buried under stones since the 13th century. A grave, containing a skeleton, was found in the crypt, which is within the oldest (11th century) part of the cathedral. The church is 65 meters long and the towers reach a height of 63 meters.

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Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Viking Age (Sweden)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Grzegorz Browarski (2 years ago)
Pretty nice cathedral (also in winter, because benches for congregation are heated). If someone is interested in architecture, it's a necessary point to visit in Skara. Building is oper for visitors and most incredible thing in it (in my opinion) is a toilet inside (usually churches don't have toilets).
Löfmark (3 years ago)
Extremely beautiful
Kristian Lundell (3 years ago)
Beautiful Church. Almost like a small cathedral.
Jens Kunst (5 years ago)
Very beautiful church. It was quiet when we visited. There's also a nice exposition section with a lot of background information. Highly recommended to visit when you are in Skara.
Timothy Wittwer (5 years ago)
It was really nice.
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