Lidköping City Hall

Lidköping, Sweden

Lidköping magnificent wooden city hall (rådhuset) was originally a originally a hunting lodge in the island of Kållandsö. It was donated to the Lidköping city by Magnus Gabriel de la Gardie in 1671. The upper floors were damaged by fire in 1950, but they are restored. Today city hall is the landmark and icon of Lidköping.

References:
  • Marianne Mehling et al. Knaurs Kulturführer in Farbe. Schweden. München 1987.

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Details

Founded: 17th century
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Sweden
Historical period: Swedish Empire (Sweden)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Lilian Hallstrom (16 months ago)
Visiting friends for the day. Very clean facilities, great food at the restaurant and a great minigolf.
Per Holger Dahlén (17 months ago)
Say Hay to Pernilla from Mr.
Rickard C (17 months ago)
Conversation at the frontdesk; - 1 person with bicycle and tent please. -That will be 450SEK. -Give me a minute to consider that. - Hallo, it's high season.
Thomas Lewin (19 months ago)
Clean, perfect service
Christopher Grinde (2 years ago)
Exactly what it claims to be. For us it was a convenient and affordable place to sleep while on training camp at the nearby bandy ice-rink. Clean , nice cabins.
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