Greek Theatre of Taormina

Taormina, Italy

Teatro antico di Taormina is an ancient Greek theatre in Taormina, built in the third century BC. The ancient theatre is built for the most part of brick, and is therefore probably of Roman date, though the plan and arrangement are in accordance with those of Greek, rather than Roman, theatres; whence it is supposed that the present structure was rebuilt upon the foundations of an older theatre of the Greek period.

With a diameter of 120 metres (after an expansion in the 2nd century), this theatre is the second largest of its kind in Sicily (after that of Syracuse); it is frequently used for operatic and theatrical performances and for concerts. The greater part of the original seats have disappeared, but the wall which surrounded the whole cavea is preserved, and the proscenium with the back wall of the scena and its appendages, of which only traces remain in most ancient theatres, are here preserved in singular integrity, and contribute much to the picturesque effect, as well as to the interest, of the ruin.

From the fragments of architectural decorations still extant we learn that it was of the Corinthian order, and richly ornamented. Some portions of a temple are also visible, converted into the church of San Pancrazio, but the edifice is of small size.

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Details

Founded: 3rd century BCE
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Geoff Eley (2 years ago)
It is impressive, didn’t go to a performance, visited during the day. I guess they’re on a limited budget but it really needs a fortune spent on it to consolidate what they’ve got and present it better, just pulling out the weeds that are growing everywhere would be appreciated. Great views.
Taras B (2 years ago)
great view at sunset, but the admission price of 10 EUR per person is a bit too much for what you get for free in other places
Matt Hare (2 years ago)
Amazing preserved architecture and view to Mt Etna. The admission price was too expensive though.
Abdulfatah Alfandi (2 years ago)
Lovely, but a bit overcrowded despite Covid precautions.
Joshua Formentera (2 years ago)
I only read this Teatro in Taormina before my visit during the second week of July 2020. It was described as a wonderful panoramic location where you can see the Etna volcano and the The Ionian Sea. When I saw this place from the top of the mountain I was amazed to see how impressive and beautiful the Ancient Greek historical theatre is and how it was built 3rd B.C centuries ago. AMAZING EXPERIENCED! The place has a fantastic view all over the sea and surrounded by the mountains and has a great photographic view. Highly recommend to see this historical landmark both the old Teatro and the old town of Taormina. The place is very popular for tourists sightseer and to buy a ticket at the entrance it might take a long while to get inside as there is always a long line of visitors.
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