Palazzo Corvaja

Taormina, Italy

Palazzo Corvaja is a medieval palace in Taormina, dating from the 10th century. The origins of the palazzo incorporate an early Arab fortress, which in turn was constructed on Roman foundations. It was subsequently added to over various periods up until the 15th century. Its main body is an Islamic-style tower, and it has an inner courtyard where the Islamic influence can be seen in the arched windows and doorways. A 13th century staircase leads up to the first floor and an ornamental balcony which overlooks the courtyard.

The palace is named after one of the oldest and most famous families of Taormina, which owned it from 1538 to 1945.

On four main floors and constructed around a courtyard, the Moorish Gothic palazzo is crenellated. The principal floor has fenestration of pairs of lancet windows divided by columns. The courtyard walls are decorated by reliefs illustrating The Creation.

Today the palazzo is used as an exhibition centre.

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Details

Founded: 10th century AD
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Dan M (19 months ago)
Not exceptional, still beautiful You'll find this interesting palace right after Porta Messina, on your left from Corso Umberto which is the main street in Taormina Old City, at the entrance of Via Teatro Greco. Besides the palace itself I'd recommend to stroll in this street. There are indeed many shops of all kind along this street, mainly souvenir shops of course, and eateries. You''ll be also very close to Bam Bar and its unforgettable Granita (try pistachio, coffee or almond). I believe you'll pass by this place whether you want it or not. Since it leads to the Roman Theater (which 10 euros entrance is by the way free on the 1st Sunday of every month) and since this Theater is on of the top 3 attraction in Taormina, you'll probably be there. As I wrote, it also crosses Corso Umberto which the Top attraction so ...let your feet lead you there, stop at this Palace, then for an hour or two at the Ancient Theater and then take a Granita and Brioche break at Bam Bar, you won't regret it.
M B (2 years ago)
Impressive courtyard
Alexander McGowan (2 years ago)
Taormina was beautiful and the view amazing. We didn't go in the palace. We were too early.
Alin Marin (4 years ago)
Looks nice from the outside. Unfortunately I didn't went inside.
Siva N Prasad (5 years ago)
An amazing touristic place to go with family and friends. It's an mesmerizing place with an amazing view of the sea from a high altitude! It's a bit rustic with all the old churches and Duomo! There are narrow pagans which will lead you to restaurants and hotels. Give it a visit and have fun!
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