Colonne di San Basilio

Lentini, Italy

The Colonne di San Basilio (Columns of St Basil) are an ancient Greek structure, which take their name from the mountain of San Basilio where they are located, in the territory of Lentini.

The summit of the mountain shows trances of ancient settlement from the prehistoric period, with clear traces of the postholes of a hut, probably belonging to the Casteluccio culture.

A little way away is the imposing structure itself, carved in the limestone rock and measuring 18 x 16 metres, with 32 columns designed to support rock slabs. Part of the structure has collapsed, but many of the columns remain standing.

The structure was later reused by the Byzantines, who converted it into a church. Some traces of religious frescoes are even visible on some of the columns, but they are not legible.

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Address

Unnamed Road, Lentini, Italy
See all sites in Lentini

Details

Founded: 5th century BC
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Salvatore Casa' (9 months ago)
Sicilian Magical Place
Mauro Manca (12 months ago)
Beautiful and magical full of history
Vincenzo Agliata (3 years ago)
Extraordinary mix of history, geology, art, archeology,
piero vaccaro (3 years ago)
Very interesting natural archaeological site .... to visit with interest for the beauty of the places
Nicola La Spina (3 years ago)
Place from the enchanting panorama on the plain of Catania and Lentini. Crossroads of civilizations that have left evident traces of their settlements. A place that preserves an underground construction from its origins and its still uncertain destination.
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