Megara Hyblaea

Augusta, Italy

Megara Hyblaea is an ancient Greek colony in Sicily It was founded about 728 BC by colonists from Megara in Attica. In 628 the city established a colony at Selinus but in 483 was destroyed by the Syracusan leader Gelon. The city had a brief independent existence in the 4th century BC, when it issued coinage, but is heard of mainly as a fortified place.

Excavations carried on in 1891 led to the discovery of the northern portion of the western town wall, which in one section served at the same time as an embankment against floods. There is also an extensive necropolis, about 1500 tombs of which have been explored, and of a deposit of votive objects from a temple. The harbour lay to the north of the town.

In the mid-seventh century, the city was organised according to a regularised plan. An agora emerged with stoas on its north and eastern sides. This is one of the earliest known agoras.

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Augusta, Italy
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Details

Founded: 728 BCE
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Italy

Rating

3.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

ant anto (12 months ago)
Archaeological site located in the industrial area between Augusta and Priolo.
Yami Yume (3 years ago)
Interesting, still full of ancient archeological relics, but abandonet to itself.
Massimiliano Fargione (4 years ago)
Place to visit but above all, by the Region, to be enhanced
Elide Russo (4 years ago)
Archaeological site practically unknown. Kept badly and only thanks to the intervention of associations of volunteers is periodically cleaned of weeds. Despite this, indeed because it is such a difficult site, it deserves to be visited
Luigi Milano (4 years ago)
Wonderful and ideal place for a walk among the ancient walls of megara
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The castle first mentioned in 1200 was originally owned by the King and later, at the end of the 13th century it fell in hands of Matúš Èák. Its owners alternated - at the end of the 14th century the family of Stibor of Stiborice bought it.

The next owners, the Bánffys who adapted the Gothic castle to the Renaissance residence, improved its fortifications preventing the Turks from conquering it at the end of the 16th century. When Bánffys died out, the castle was owned by several noble families. It fell in decay after fire in 1729.

The history of the castle is the subject of different legends. One of them narrates the origin of the name of castle derived from that of jester Becko for whom the Duke Stibor had the castle built.

Another legend has it that the lord of the castle had his servant thrown down from the rock because he protected his child from the lords favourite dog. Before his death, the servant pronounced a curse saying that they would meet in a year and days time, and indeed precisely after that time the lord was bitten by a snake and fell down to the same abyss.

The well-conserved ruins of the castle, now the National Cultural Monument, are frequently visited by tourists, above all in July when the castle festival takes place. The former Ambro curia situated below the castle now shelters the exhibition of the local history.