Church of the Santissima Annunziata dei Catalani

Messina, Italy

The Church of the Santissima Annunziata dei Catalani is an example of Norman architecture on Sicily. It dates from the 12th century, when Sicily was under Norman rule. Built on top of the ruins of an older temple dedicated to Neptune, the church is an example of Sicilian Norman architecture with its mix of different cultural elements.

The church displays influences from Arab and Byzantine architecture and also contains Roman elements. Particularly the apse is unusually well-preserved. The name of the church derives from merchants from Catalonia who established a presence in Messina in the 16th century.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

mustafa cutlerywala (2 years ago)
Great place with lovely architecture
Sumit Roy (3 years ago)
Nice architecture
Jana Kolpakova (3 years ago)
Although I didn’t like Messina, this place was really beautiful!
Mariano Elisa Tolentino (4 years ago)
Church of the Santissima Annunziata dei Catalani is a very old and a historic piece of architecture. The church displays influences from Arab and Byzantine architecture and also contains Roman elements. It is worth paying a visit to this church. Magnificent!!! .
Marilou Tolentino (5 years ago)
Walking around the city of Messina without map, we stumbled upon this different-looking building so we went down to see what it had to offer us. It IS a church!!! It is rich in history (just google it, thanks :-) ) but to see it in person is magnificent! For someone who is keen on architecture, this is a good study!
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