Palazzo del Monte di Pietà

Messina, Italy

Palazzo del Monte di Pietà was built in 1616 for the Arciconfraternita degli Azzurri. The building was modified in 1741 with the addition of a first floor, a bell tower and a staircase. These were built to designs of the architect Antonino Basile. A fountain decorated with a statue of Abundance was built in the middle of the staircase.

The structure was damaged during the earthquake of 1783 and that of 1908. The building's upper floor was largely destroyed during the latter earthquake. The structure was further damaged by World War II bombings. Restoration of the building began in 1979, and it is now used for cultural purposes.

Architecture

The Palazzo del Monte di Pietà is built in the Mannerist style. The ground floor has a central rusticated portal topped by a broken pediment, flanked by two windows on each side. The windows are topped by triangular pediments, and they are separated by niches.

The first floor of the building, which was constructed in the 18th century, had an open balcony flanked by two windows on each side. The balcony and the lower parts of the windows can still be seen, but the rest of the floor was destroyed in the 1908 earthquake.

The building contains a large vaulted hall which opens into a courtyard. This leads to the 18th-century monumental staircase, leading to the Church of Santa Maria della Pietà. Only part of the façade of the church has survived; the building itself was destroyed during the 1908 earthquake.

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Details

Founded: 1616
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Andrea Parisi (12 months ago)
Fantastic place of culture and memory
Sumit Roy (2 years ago)
Historical
Francesco Galletta (2 years ago)
Beyond the fact that in the evidence it is a beautiful place, that we all know to be used for shows, exhibitions and photo shoots and that it is not always open, I would focus the review on other themes. I'd like to understand what this place really wants to be. A rest? (the left part of the building was bombed in the Second World War and is rebuilt); a ruin? (the church is no longer there but there are its base and foundation parts in the midst of weeds and trees); an unfinished integration? (the noble floor is only mentioned but has never been rebuilt). This is a place of private property (Azzurri) but of strong public value (pre earthquake city). How should it be managed? Who should intervene? With whose money? I have not seen any project that returns to the area of ​​the church its necessary value of historical space, nor of the possible proposals for the noble floor. In short, a beautiful place but one that does not know what it will do when it grows up.
Sergio Gutierrez (2 years ago)
Abandoned
Jaime Mejia (3 years ago)
Interesting
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