Small & Great Guild Hall

Riga, Latvia

During the centuries of German economic domination, the guilds were Riga's power brokers. The former, dating from 1384, was the home of the merchants, while the latter held the city's artisans. These slightly different audiences are reflected in the respective usage of the buildings today: while the Great Guild is home to the Latvian Symphony Orchestra, its smaller cousin hosts conferences and the occasional disco. The Small Guild is now also open to the public during the day for a small admission fee of 1Ls.

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Address

Amatu iela 3-5, Riga, Latvia
See all sites in Riga

Details

Founded: 1384
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Latvia
Historical period: State of the Teutonic Order (Latvia)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ra Mie (2 years ago)
Great architecture. There's also a legend about the cat on the roof protecting the owner.
Artūrs Laizāns (2 years ago)
Nice place for concerts. A bit cold in winter. I believe it is not weelchair accessable.
Netanel Pollak (2 years ago)
Fantastic concert hall. Great sound. Very much recommended.
Dagmar Neves (2 years ago)
Exquisite interior. The choral concert competition was outstanding. This is a magical place.
Kristians Luhaers (2 years ago)
A Neo Gothic pearl of Old Town of Riga! Johann Felsko masterpiece. Marvelous! Take the tour of the building, (NB! you have to check it in advance, would it be possible to have a guided tour there, but they do that during the summer) and you will have some unforgettable glimpses of 19th century interiors, terrazzo mosaics and mesmerising stained glass windows. You won't regret! Picture courtesy of Mr. Romualds Pipars a director and cameraman who running a small film studio there.
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