Museum of the Occupation of Latvia

Riga, Latvia

Museum of the Occupation of Latvia 1940-1991 (Latvijas okupācijas muzejs) is an historic educational institution. It was established in 1993 to exhibit artifacts, archive documents, and educate the public about the 51-year period in the 20th century when Latvia was successively occupied by the USSR in 1940, then by Nazi Germany in 1941, and then again by the USSR in 1944.

The museum's stated mission is to show what happened in Latvia, its land and people under two occupying totalitarian regimes from 1940 to 1991, remind the world of the crimes committed by foreign powers against the state and people of Latvia and remember the victims of the occupation: those who perished, were persecuted, forcefully deported or fled the terror of the occupation regimes.

The building of the museum was built already in 1971 to celebrate Lenin's 100th birthday and up until 1991 it served as the Museum of Red Latvian Riflemen.

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Address

Svaru iela 7, Riga, Latvia
See all sites in Riga

Details

Founded: 1971
Category: Museums in Latvia
Historical period: Soviet Era (Latvia)

More Information

www.omf.lv
en.wikipedia.org

Rating

3.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Helle Damgaard Andersen (11 months ago)
Temporarily closed until 2020. Other exhibition near freedom monument
Jørgen Jakob Friis (12 months ago)
Kind of temporary while rebuilding the real one so some details are missing. Interestingly presented though
Stefan Andrushenko (12 months ago)
Excellent, well translated and thorough. By donation. Note temporary location near freedom monument for next couple years.
Andrew Betts (14 months ago)
Informative and interesting, though currently it is not in this location. It will move back here in 2020 after the building had been renovated. Meanwhile it is located just west of the freedom monument.
Shona C (14 months ago)
This museum is very easy to get to, and is less than one minute away from the Freedom Monument. It is free but requests donations as payments. Information on the boards is very comprehensive and is in Latvian and English with Russian and German information booklets available. You should definitely try to make your way to this museum if you're in Riga. It will probably only take you around an hour and is definitely worth it.
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