Riga Old Town

Riga, Latvia

Riga Old Town (Vecrīga) is the historical center of Riga, Latvia, located on the east side of Daugava River. Vecrīga is famous for its old churches and cathedrals, such as Riga Cathedral and St. Peter's church.

Vecrīga is the original area of Riga and consists of the historic city limits before the city was greatly expanded over the years. In the old days, Vecrīga was protected by a surrounding wall except the side adjacent to the Daugava river bank. When the wall was torn down, the waters from Daugava filled the space creating Riga City Canal.

In the 1980s Vecrīga's streets were closed to traffic and only area residents and local delivery vehicles are allowed within Vecrīga's limits with special permits. Vecrīga is part of a UNESCO World Heritage Site listed as "Historic Centre of Riga".

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Address

Kungu iela, Riga, Latvia
See all sites in Riga

Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Historic city squares, old towns and villages in Latvia
Historical period: German Crusades (Latvia)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Patrick Lambert (20 months ago)
Excellently trained and lovely staff who made our trip very delightful! We felt very welcome from the maids to the waiters and reception.
Dominique Lugard (2 years ago)
Feels a little more like a good Novotel than a Pullman. Breakfast is good, in a bright beautiful venue. Room didn’t include a bathtub. Hotel is in a convenient location.
Max (2 years ago)
Convenient central location, modern rooms, good breakfast and nice restaurant on premises. Note that taxis can’t drop off and pick up right at main entrance (due to restricted street access for cars without special plate numbers) and you will have to walk a bit across a small park. This is the view from a pool area on the 7th floor.
Juan Ángel Martínez (2 years ago)
Hotel very closed to the old Riga town. Big rooms, very clean, and also modern furniture. Very nice Cesar salad and ice-cream offered by room service.
Erik Sanders (2 years ago)
What a great hotel. Room was amazing. Breakfast was very good and the staff is very helpful and kind. And I loved the rain shower. It is at a great location in the old city center. I think most can be done by foot. Exploring the old town was great. Loved the history and stories. One has every reason to pick this hotel when in Riga.
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