Late Baroque Town of Palazzolo Acreide

Palazzolo Acreide, Italy

The area around Palazzolo Acreide has been inhabited since ancient times. The old city was probably destroyed by the Arabs, in the first half of the 9th century. The new city was built around a Norman castle, which no longer exists. An earthquake in 1693 destroyed almost the entire city, which was slowly rebuilt in the following centuries.

Thanks to the many fascinating buildings in Baroque style, Palazzolo Acreide has been incorporated in the UNESCO World Heritage site of Late Baroque Towns of the Val di Noto since 2002.

The city has many late Baroque style churches, inculding The Chiesa Madre ('Mother Church'). The first document attesting its existence dates from 1215, when the church was dedicated to St. Nicholas. It was largely rebuilt and redecorated after the earthquake of 1693, with a Neo-classicist façade. The interior is on the Latin cross plan, with a nave and two aisles decorated with precious polychrome marbles.

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