Favara Castle

Favara, Italy

Built in the 13th century by the Chiaramonte family, the Favara castle is of particular interest because it represents the transitional phase between castle and palace. The Palace, as it is in fact commonly called because of the square arrangement of its various parts, recalls the typical lay-out of the Swabian castles that sprang up in eastern Sicily and may be compared with the palacia or solacia built by King Frederick II of Swabia (1194-1250) in Sicily and Puglia some 50 years before. The building's partial use as a residence not in any case intended strictly for military purposes is reflected in its not particularly dominating position.

The first order of the Palace is compact in appearance, while the second order is cut through by two-light windows, some of which were replaced in the Renaissance by architraved windows.

The rooms on the ground floor of the castle, once used as storehouses, stables, and servants' living quarters, have barrel vaults; they all open onto the courtyard, with ogival doors and various 16th-, 18th-, and 19th-cent. additions, getting their light through narrow loopholes.

In the entrance hallway there is a stone bearing a mysterious, indecipherable inscription that according to local tradition proclaims the whereabouts of a hidden treasure.

Of particular interest are the chapel and the portal, which is flanked on either side by two little columns and a marble frieze decorated with a basso-relievo and winged cupids.

The motifs of the decorations are clearly echoes of the Norman age: in particular, the shafts of the columns and the chapters recall those of the Cloister of Monreale.

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Address

Via Cafisi 28, Favara, Italy
See all sites in Favara

Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sicily my Love (3 months ago)
The Chiaramonte Castle can be considered the main palace of the city of Favara. Located on the north-west side of Piazza Cavour, according to historians it was built by Frederick II of Chiaramonte around 1270.
Tiziana Gianformaggio Chambers (2 years ago)
Good value for money, very interesting history. A member of staff gave some very useful explanations that enriched our visit.
Tiziana Gianformaggio Chambers (2 years ago)
Good value for money, very interesting history. A member of staff gave some very useful explanations that enriched our visit.
Daniel Băcăuanu (2 years ago)
Ok
Daniel Băcăuanu (2 years ago)
Ok
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