Santo Spirito Abbey

Caltanissetta, Italy

The Abbey of the Santo Spirito (Holy Spirit), built by the Norman Count Ruggero and his wife Queen Adelasia in 1092–1098, was consecrated in 1153. It has been greatly altered in subsequent centuries. The original outlines are still identifiable to the rear, where its characteristic massive jutting apses can be seen. These are separated by flat pilasters and connected by a series of small arches. The left-hand entrance has an ogival portal from the 13th century. The lunette once contained a figure of Christ Blessing, which was eventually moved inside the Abbey. Notable are the rectangular nave and wooden-beamed ceiling. The walls and the apses have frescoes attributed to the 14th century. The vault of the apse shows a 17th-century figure of Christ Pantocrator.

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Founded: 1092-1153
Category: Religious sites in Italy

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Bruno Boano (8 months ago)
Molto bella esternamente in quanto quando sono passato era chiusa
Vincenzo Diliberto (9 months ago)
Beautiful, ancient and suggestive.
maura manule (9 months ago)
Live the magic ...... breathe peace and tranquility in an atmosphere with fairytale contours. It seems to go back in time .... very impressive
enrico maida (10 months ago)
Atmosphere suitable for prayer, Don Leo a smart priest!
Alain Kersmaeekers (11 months ago)
Awesome little church, we went for a wedding
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