Hippana was an ancient town of Sicily, mentioned by Polybius as being taken by assault by the Romans in the First Punic War, 260 BCE. Diodorus, in relating the events of the same campaign, mentions the capture of a town called 'Sittana', for which we should in all probability read 'Hippana'. It sat astride the main road from Panormus (modern Palermo) to Agrigentum (modern Agrigento) upon Monte dei Cavalli.

Some manuscripts of Pliny mention the name of Ipanenses in his list of Sicilian towns, where the older editions have Ichanenses. If this reading be adopted, it in all probability refers to the same place as the Hippana of Polybius; but as the reading Ichanenses is also supported by the authority of Stephanus (who notices Ichana as a town of Sicily), the point must be considered doubtful.

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Address

Unnamed Road, Prizzi, Italy
See all sites in Prizzi

Details

Founded: 7th century BCE
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

salvo alferi (3 years ago)
salvo alferi (3 years ago)
Emilio Messina (4 years ago)
Unfortunately, the shepherds have taken possession of the place. A shame. All fenced with barbed wire and goat poop everywhere. The theater unearthed a few years ago has now been swallowed up by vegetation. An endless shame. A similar place should not do this
Emilio Messina (4 years ago)
Unfortunately, the shepherds have taken possession of the place. A shame. All fenced with barbed wire and goat poop everywhere. The theater unearthed a few years ago has now been swallowed up by vegetation. An endless shame. A similar place should not do this
Antonino Scaduto (5 years ago)
Abandoned, no archaeological relevance is more visible
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