St Vigeans Church serves the parish of the ancient village of St Vigeans on the outskirts of Arbroath. The church was rebuilt in the 12th century but not consecrated until 1242 by David de Bernham, Bishop of St Andrews. The church underwent some alteration in the 15th century, but suffered very little change following the Scottish Reformation of 1560. A major restoration was carried out in 1871 by the Scottish Victorian architect Robert Rowand Anderson.

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Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in United Kingdom

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sandra Bell (2 years ago)
It is a beautiful church in a very pretty setting. Lots of history.
Claire Pullar (2 years ago)
Lovely church sadly no minister assigned at the moment.
Jean Clark (2 years ago)
Beautiful building, high on the hill, historic village at its feet. Closed when I was there.
Heather Gourlay (2 years ago)
Beautiful church and concert venue with a lovely piano.
David Petrie (2 years ago)
Gr8 historical place to visit in a very quiet place to relax etc .
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