Kastellet is a small citadel located on the islet Kastellholmen. The first fortification on the location was built in 1667 designed by Erik Dahlbergh. It exploded in June 1845 and subsequently a new was built 1846-1848 to the design of architect Fredrik Blom. It consists of a round tower with red brick walls and a 20 meter high stair tower. On the top flies the Military Ensign of Sweden, it is hoisted and lowered every day, indicating the nation is at peace.

On May 17, 1996, the Norwegian Constitution Day, some Norwegian expats raised the Norwegian flag in the tower. Though such an action would historically have been taken as a declaration of war, a diplomatic crisis could be avoided.

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Details

Founded: 1846-1848
Category: Castles and fortifications in Sweden
Historical period: Union with Norway and Modernization (Sweden)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kim Hagström (2 years ago)
Swedish Naval Officers Club spectacular location. Exterior pics in pipeline (Comming soon)
ustoopia (2 years ago)
Nice building but not open for tourists
Luke Marris (2 years ago)
Nice view. Worth a quick visit of you are nearby. I would not go out of my way to see it.
Magnus S (2 years ago)
Kastellet was built in 1848 and is flying the Swedish naval flag. I have never been up in the tower, and I don't think there is an easy way to get up in the tower (perhaps join the Sea Scouts, think they have their headquarters in the building). But the view over Grönalund from the base of the tower is still spectacular and you can quite often see sea gulls "standing" still in the wind just a few meters away from you.
Alex Ronn (2 years ago)
Really great place to see the harbor from. Was a beautiful day when we went and it was wonderfully clear. If I was coming to Stockholm for the firm time I would go here for sure.
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