Rodney's Stone is a two-metre high Pictish cross slab now located close on the approach way to Brodie Castle, near Forres. It was originally found nearby in the grounds of the old church of Dyke and Moy. It is classed as a Class II Pictish stone, meaning that it has a cross on one face, and symbols on the other. On the symbols face, at the top, are two fish monsters; below is a 'Pictish Beast', and below that a double disc and z-rod. On the cross face there is a cross and some animals.

The stone is most notable, however, for its inscription, which is found on both of the sides and on the cross face. It is the longest of all Pictish inscriptions, and like most Pictish inscriptions, is written in the Ogham alphabet. Much of the inscription is weathered, but it does contain the Pictish name Ethernan (a prominent Pictish saint), written as EDDARRNON.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 500-800 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in United Kingdom

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

David Bruce (3 months ago)
Astonishingly detailed, Trajan inspired carved obelisk like column which already an established landmark when the (real) King Macbeth ruled in Alba-Scotland from Forres
Judith Jamieson (4 months ago)
Stunning! Amazing to see and just look at history. Would recommend a visit
Kenny MacCormack (5 months ago)
Interesting
Martin Gibson (6 months ago)
Very interesting
Sambavi Jeyadasan (6 months ago)
A hidden gem with superb inscriptions and an information board with other places to visit on it too! Not crowded at all. I recommend for anyone looking for a hidden historical site! It is super easy to reach too, just turn left from the main road and you will soon reach the stone if you keep going straight. There is a parking place for a single car but as not many people visit it this is mostly not preoccupied. Anyways, enjoy your visit!
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Beckov Castle

The Beckov castle stands on a steep 50 m tall rock in the village Beckov. The dominance of the rock and impression of invincibility it gaves, challenged our ancestors to make use of these assets. The result is a remarkable harmony between the natural setting and architecture.

The castle first mentioned in 1200 was originally owned by the King and later, at the end of the 13th century it fell in hands of Matúš Èák. Its owners alternated - at the end of the 14th century the family of Stibor of Stiborice bought it.

The next owners, the Bánffys who adapted the Gothic castle to the Renaissance residence, improved its fortifications preventing the Turks from conquering it at the end of the 16th century. When Bánffys died out, the castle was owned by several noble families. It fell in decay after fire in 1729.

The history of the castle is the subject of different legends. One of them narrates the origin of the name of castle derived from that of jester Becko for whom the Duke Stibor had the castle built.

Another legend has it that the lord of the castle had his servant thrown down from the rock because he protected his child from the lords favourite dog. Before his death, the servant pronounced a curse saying that they would meet in a year and days time, and indeed precisely after that time the lord was bitten by a snake and fell down to the same abyss.

The well-conserved ruins of the castle, now the National Cultural Monument, are frequently visited by tourists, above all in July when the castle festival takes place. The former Ambro curia situated below the castle now shelters the exhibition of the local history.