Dunrobin Castle is the most northerly of Scotland's great houses and the largest in the Northern Highlands with 189 rooms. It is also one of Britain's oldest continuously inhabited houses dating back to the early 1300s. Dunrobin Castle has been called home to the Earls and Dukes of Sutherland since the 13th century and was first mentioned as a stronghold of the family in 1401. The castle stands possibly on the site of an early medieval fort. The name Dun Robin means Robin's Hill or Fort in Gaelic and may have come from Robert, the 6th Earl of Sutherland who died in 1427.

The early castle was actually a fortified, square keep, with walls six feet thick and a vaulted ceiling, looking out from a cliff-top position. The keep stood isolated for some 200 years until a staircase and a high house were added. It was encased by a series of additions from the 16th century onwards. In 1785 a large extension was constructed. Remarkably this early keep still survives, much altered, within the complex of these later extensions, making Dunrobin one of the oldest inhabited houses in Scotland.

Sir Charles Barry was retained in 1845 to completely re-model the castle, to change it from a fort to a house in the Scottish Baronial style that had become popular among the aristocracy, who were inspired by Queen Victoria's new residence at Balmoral. Barry had been the architect for the Houses of Parliament in London and was much in demand. There is very much a French influence with conical spires to the whole project, including the gardens, based on Versailles, which he laid out in the 1850s. Much of Barry's interior was destroyed by a fire in 1915 and the interior today is mainly the work of Scottish architect, Sir Robert Lorimer, who altered the top of the main tower and clock tower at the north side of the building to the Scottish Renaissance style.

Following the death of the 5th Duke in 1963, the Earldom and Dukedom were separted. The Dukedom passed on through the male line whilst the present Countess of Sutherland inherited the Earldom. The Castle became a boys’ boarding school for a period of seven years from the late 1960s before reverting back to being a family house.

Dunrobin Castle is open annually in summer season.

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Founded: 13th/19th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in United Kingdom

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User Reviews

Ants Carver (9 months ago)
Great place to visit. Also was lucky to see the falconry exhibition. Normally not on during this time of year. Was really informative and interesting. Would love to revisit when the castle is fully reopened.
Adryne San Martins (9 months ago)
Amazing experience visiting Dunrobin Castle. The gardens were beautiful and so the ponds. I really enjoyed the rooms in the castle. I had the chance to learn more about the history of the family who lived there. The staff were friendly and happy. There was also a falconry event on the field. I simply loved it!
Lynne Barbour (10 months ago)
Parts of castle and museum closed due to covid not worth entrance fee.
N3X VIJA (11 months ago)
Very good place to visit on the North Coast 500. The scenery was breathtaking and the food in the tea room was amazing and very good value for money. I would seriously recommend this place to anyone visiting the Scottish Highlands
Edson Oliveira (11 months ago)
The area which one can visit inside the castle is very limited, but extremely interesting to see! The garden area is tremendous!!! Really beautiful and well looked after! There was a bonus quick show to see birds of prey as well
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