Brodie Castle is a well-preserved Z plan castle located about 5.5 kilometres west of Forres, in Moray. The original Z-plan castle was built in 1567 by Clan Brodie but was destroyed by fire in 1645 by Lewis Gordon of Clan Gordon, the 3rd Marquis of Huntly. In 1824, architect William Burn was commissioned to convert it into a large mansion house in the Scots Baronial style, but these additions were never completed and were later remodelled by James Wylson (c. 1845).

The Brodie family called the castle home until the early 21st century. It is widely accepted that the Brodies have been associated with the land on which the castle is built since around 1160, when it is believed that King Malcolm IV gave the land to the family.

Architecturally, the castle has a very well-preserved 16th-century central keep with two 5-storey towers on opposing corners. The interior of the castle is also well preserved, containing fine antique furniture, oriental artifacts and painted ceilings, largely dating from the 17th–19th centuries.

Today the castle and surrounding policies, including a national daffodil collection, are owned by the National Trust for Scotland and are open to the public to visit throughout the year. The castle may be hired for weddings and indoor or outdoor events. An ancient Pictish monument known as Rodney's Stone can be seen in the castle grounds.

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Address

Forres, United Kingdom
See all sites in Forres

Details

Founded: 16th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in United Kingdom

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jenni B (11 months ago)
Worth visiting for the Playful Garden alone. Lovely place with beautiful castle and gardens. Fab staff and great tearoom to boot.
Iain Spencer (12 months ago)
Interesting spot, the gardens were lovely and the staff were knowledgeable and interesting. The ice-cream was fabulous. I had chocolate, which was one of the best ice-cream I'd eaten, and I must say I've eaten a lot!
Simon Hepple (12 months ago)
The playful garden is a really great place to visit. The kids love it. Beautifully maintained grounds. I would recommend to anyone looking for something to do with the kids.
Damien Vanhille (12 months ago)
Castle fully booked for today, but impossible to book online. Are you suppose to come at 8am to visit at 3pm? No thanks, I've got better to do. Like all National Trust properties, is it lovely, but they do not know how to manage things properly. That's probably why I will not renew my membership with them, sadly...
Drew Mackenzie (13 months ago)
The grounds are amazing for kids to run around in and the castle is a nice visit although once you've done it once there's not much need to go back. The walled garden and the AR attraction is OK too but, the playpark outside of the wall is as good if not better for the kids.
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