Brodie Castle is a well-preserved Z plan castle located about 5.5 kilometres west of Forres, in Moray. The original Z-plan castle was built in 1567 by Clan Brodie but was destroyed by fire in 1645 by Lewis Gordon of Clan Gordon, the 3rd Marquis of Huntly. In 1824, architect William Burn was commissioned to convert it into a large mansion house in the Scots Baronial style, but these additions were never completed and were later remodelled by James Wylson (c. 1845).

The Brodie family called the castle home until the early 21st century. It is widely accepted that the Brodies have been associated with the land on which the castle is built since around 1160, when it is believed that King Malcolm IV gave the land to the family.

Architecturally, the castle has a very well-preserved 16th-century central keep with two 5-storey towers on opposing corners. The interior of the castle is also well preserved, containing fine antique furniture, oriental artifacts and painted ceilings, largely dating from the 17th–19th centuries.

Today the castle and surrounding policies, including a national daffodil collection, are owned by the National Trust for Scotland and are open to the public to visit throughout the year. The castle may be hired for weddings and indoor or outdoor events. An ancient Pictish monument known as Rodney's Stone can be seen in the castle grounds.

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Address

Forres, United Kingdom
See all sites in Forres

Details

Founded: 16th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in United Kingdom

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jill Burt (3 months ago)
We love visiting Brodie Castle, especially because of the Playful Garden which our kids love. They spend hours playing there. The adventure play park is fun too. The actual castle was less interesting to us but there are nice woodland walks. Dogs are allowed in the grounds but not in the play park or playful garden. Nice cafe. Wish dogs were allowed in the playful garden on lead so we could all sit in there while the kids played.
Robert Paterson (3 months ago)
New lights up around the ground makes the castle look nice. Kids had a play in the park. We went for a walk around the pond and back great to be out in the fresh air
Ann Whittaker (3 months ago)
Visted during pandemic. Castle not open but gardens children's play area & cafe open. Lovely clean toilets & free parking & entrance to open amenities. Had a lovely morning wandering the grounds finished off with tea & apple blackcurrant flapjacks. Delicious
Nicola Wall (4 months ago)
Lovely park for kids of all ages to play in. Cafe unfortunately closed when we visited. Nice grounds to walk round.
D B (5 months ago)
Beautiful place to visit even under restrictions (castle itself is still closed due to covid 19). Has gorgeous grounds to walk around or sit and have a wee picnic(mind take your rubbish home with you). Has plenty of seating areas and has ample car parking close by. Toilets are also available. An ideal place to visit for young and old.
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