Dornoch Cathedral was built in the 13th century, in the reign of King Alexander II (1214–49) and the episcopate of Gilbert de Moravia (later Saint Gilbert of Dornoch) as the cathedral church of the diocese of Caithness.

In 1570 the Cathedral was burnt down during local feuding. Full restoration was not carried out until the early 19th century, by the Countess of Sutherland. Among the 'improvements' carried out, the ruined but still largely intact aisled medieval nave was demolished and a new narrow nave without pillars built on its site. The interior was reordered in the 1920s by Rev. Charles Donald Bentinck, with the removal of Victorian plasterwork to reveal the stonework (although the medieval church would have been plastered throughout). The site of the medieval high altar was raised and converted into a burial area for the Sutherland family, who introduced large marble memorials alien to the original appearance of the building.

The Cathedral's churchyard is adjoined by Dornoch Castle, the somewhat reconstructed remains of the medieval palace of the Bishops of Caithness.

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Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in United Kingdom

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User Reviews

Monika V. (18 months ago)
In einem mir völlig unbekannten, noch nie gehörtem Ort, fanden wir diese Kathedrale aus dem 13.Jahrhundert. Sie besticht durch tolle Fenster. Auch das Innere war sehr sehenswert.
katie woof (18 months ago)
Stunning cathedral with the most beautiful well detailed stained glass windows. It is most definitely worth a visit when in the area.
Aiden (2 years ago)
Robert Tragis (2 years ago)
Stunning cathedral open to all a must to vist
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