Château de Mehun-sur-Yèvre

Mehun-sur-Yèvre, France

The existence of a fortification at the site of Mehun-sur-Yèvre dates from antiquity. The major remains are of the early 13th century and the later 14th century. The present standing ruins date from a castle founded under the Courtenays after 1209. This fortress was transformed into a princely residence by John, Duke of Berry in 1367. Largely ruined in the 18th century the castle represented an excellent example of late Gothic architecture and early Renaissance architecture. Charles VII of France, died in the castle on July 22, 1461.

The castle is built on a trapezoid plan, and originally had a tall cylindrical tower at each corner and a rectangular tower in the middle of one of the long sides. An entrance was formed in the wall between two of the towers. One tower (12m diameter) was much larger than the others (8m) and served as the keep. The keep and the west tower still stand to their full height, each capped with intricate defensive machicolations. Manuscript illustrations indicate that the castle also had a large chapel above the principal entrance.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Ruins in France
Historical period: Late Capetians (France)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Patrick Willems (11 months ago)
Zeker een bezoek waard wegens interessante info maar wel 168 trappen om boven in de toren te raken ...
Jean Philippe Millet (11 months ago)
Visite captivante, guide fort sympathique qui connait son sujet à 500% Je recommande vivement
Atlantis Atlantis (11 months ago)
Top
Olivia Preddy Clay (3 years ago)
Beautiful place to visit
Jojo Lion (4 years ago)
Je ne peux pas noter plus parce que je n'ai pas eu l'occasion de voir l'intérieur mais on peut passer un agréable moment en famille ou en couple au alentours. Très belle vue.
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