Nuraghe Palmavera

Alghero, Italy

The nuraghe Palmavera is classified as a complex nuraghe, that consists of several towers joined together. The nuraghe and the surrounding village were built in various phase during the Bronze Age and the Iron Age.

The main tower dates back to the first phase (15th-14th century BC) and retains the central chamber covered with the tholos and built with stones in limestone. The tower is archaic, with the entrance free of side passages and with the niches just sketched in the walls of the main chamber. There must have been also some huts outside the nuraghe.

In the second phase (first half of the ninth century BC) was added a second tower and restored the previous tower with blocks of sandstone. The two towers communicated through an interior courtyard and a corridor with niches.

It was also built the meeting hut, equipped with a stone seat that runs along the perimeter, interrupted by a tank made of stone slabs, of unknown function, and a round stone seat for the chief, standing next to a niche in the wall. At the center of the hut, on a circular altar, it is present a model of a nuragic tower in sandstone. In this period were also built other huts in the village of higher dimension.

In the third phase (9th-8th century BC), the nuraghe was restored again with blocks of limestone and around it was built an exterior wall with four towers-huts, forming two outer courts, divided by a wall with no openings. In one of these courts it was inserted the meeting hut, in the other has been identified a silo.

The village was destroyed by fire, probably at the end of the eighth century BC and was later sporadically attended in Punic and Roman times, as witnessed by some pottery found.

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Details

Founded: 1400-1300 BCE
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Rebekah Shaw-Macleod (3 months ago)
Very atmospheric. Well excavated and well kept. Lots of information around too.
Ben Dive (5 months ago)
Friendly staff and some information panels, but the complete lack of artifacts and the small size of the excavations simply means there is very little to see and very little understanding to be gained.
Massimo Amato (6 months ago)
We can understand very well how the 1000 b.c. people were organized in Sardinia. Very beautiful place. Great "nuragic" people!
Stefan Zobrist (6 months ago)
Beautiful place. Very friendly. Well maintained. Kids had some fun. There is a bar as well.
Brad Deveson (2 years ago)
Whilst the tower is great to enter (mind your head!) what I loved was the layout of the houses. Some abut each other whilst others leave a pathway between. Seemed very human for some reason. No council planning permission but maybe some heated arguments and rock throwing...
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