Casteldoria Castle was built around the 12th century by the Genoese Doria family, and passed from the Genoese dominion to the Aragonese, then to the Arborea Giudicato and lastly to the Malaspina family.

Only a few ruins remain of the fortress: parts of the walls, the remains of a chapel and a large cistern that was probably used to collect and store water. The famous tower, on the other hand, is well-preserved, and is an important part of the castle, built in large, rectangular granite blocks set in mortar. Twenty metres high, it has a pentagonal layout with the entrance on the north-eastern side. On the same side are two large, non-aligned openings, and a large window on the opposite side on the first floor. Inside, the castle has three wooden floors with a tiled roof and walkway. The last floor was created from what was originally a mezzanine floor before a terrace.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

More Information

www.sardegnaturismo.it

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Alek Hojnik (2 years ago)
A nice five sided castle/tower in the middle of the forest. It gazes with pride toward the sky and makes you envision the people living there. It has 5 levels, but as it is in renovation, you can't enter. Still, the place offers some great views towards the coast and the small lake below. The road and the parking are well maintained. The path is a bit step, recommend sneakers or other shoes with firm grip as the grawel gets slippery.
Barnabas Hamerlik (2 years ago)
Wonderful view and panorama of the surrounding nature from the tower. Worth climbing up the steep ladders.
Timothy Black (3 years ago)
Abandoned castle on a neat ridge. About a 15 minute hike up a gravel road. Nothing much around except the tower, and it doesn't seem to be a popular place for tourist, which is nice if you like getting of the beaten path.
Marco Galbiati Stella (3 years ago)
Spectacular views above a beautiful, wild canyon (only sad thing, a horrible hotel built right at the beginning of the canyon. An eyesore, happily not visible anymore once you're in the canyon, nor from the tower)
Huib (5 years ago)
Nice for quick stop
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Arles Amphitheatre

The two-tiered Roman amphitheatre is probably the most prominent tourist attraction in the city of Arles, which thrived in Roman times. Built in 90 AD, the amphitheatre was capable of seating over 20,000 spectators, and was built to provide entertainment in the form of chariot races and bloody hand-to-hand battles. Today, it draws large crowds for bullfighting as well as plays and concerts in summer.

The building measures 136 m in length and 109 m wide, and features 120 arches. It has an oval arena surrounded by terraces, arcades on two levels (60 in all), bleachers, a system of galleries, drainage system in many corridors of access and staircases for a quick exit from the crowd. It was obviously inspired by the Colosseum in Rome (in 72-80), being built slightly later (in 90).

With the fall of the Empire in the 5th century, the amphitheatre became a shelter for the population and was transformed into a fortress with four towers (the southern tower is not restored). The structure encircled more than 200 houses, becoming a real town, with its public square built in the centre of the arena and two chapels, one in the centre of the building, and another one at the base of the west tower.

This new residential role continued until the late 18th century, and in 1825 through the initiative of the writer Prosper Mérimée, the change to national historical monument began. In 1826, expropriation began of the houses built within the building, which ended by 1830 when the first event was organized in the arena - a race of the bulls to celebrate the taking of Algiers.

Arles Amphitheatre is listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, together with other Roman buildings of the city, as part of the Arles, Roman and Romanesque Monuments group.