Balaiana Castle

Luogosanto, Italy

The Balaiana Castle is situated on Mount San Leonardo, at 299 metres above sea level, dominating the surrounding valley. You can walk through a staircase carved between granite rocks where the start path is located in the parking area, just 5 km from the village, on the road to Arzachena.

The castle's unique architecture, with features such as the special interlocking blocks of granite corners, dates back to the 12th century. The castle was destroyed by the army of Alfonso of Aragon, who had razed the structure almost completely to the ground in 1442.

The small church dedicated to San Leonardo was built as a chapel of the castle and is a rare example of Romanesque architecture in Gallura. The chapel can be reached via a path just a few dozen metres north of the Castle. The similarity between the churches in Corsica suggests that in the second half of the 12th century there was a shift between the islands of the Mediterranean and the manufacturers who used the granite stone.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

More Information

www.gallurago.com

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

claudio arru (2 years ago)
Bisogna faticare per arrivarci ma gode di una bella vista. Ps. Portarsi una penna
claudio arru (2 years ago)
You have to work hard to get there but it has a nice view. Ps. Bring a pen ? if you want to leave a trace of the passage in your diary
Riccardo Sanna (2 years ago)
Nature, History, Religion and Relax! Picnic area with tables and chairs! Path with steps leading up to the top of the Hill. From there you can enjoy a breathtaking view!
Riccardo Sanna (2 years ago)
Nature, History, Religion and Relax! Picnic area with tables and chairs! Path with steps leading up to the top of the Hill. From there you can enjoy a breathtaking view!
F Exslager (3 years ago)
Not the easiest to reach- be prepared for increasing heartbeat- but the view is worth it!
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