Cathedral of Santa María de Vitoria

Vitoria-Gasteiz, Spain

The Cathedral of Santa María de Vitoria is a Gothic-style, Roman Catholic cathedral located in Vitoria-Gasteiz.

Construction of the cathedral of Santa María in Gothic-style began in the late 13th century and continued throughout the 14th century. It was conceived as a fortress church, with great volume and enclosed appearance, being part of the city's defences.

Between 1496 and 1861, the building operated as a collegiate church, and it was that year when it was declared a cathedral. It has a Latin-cross plan, with a wide transept crossing and circular apse containing several chapels.

The facade's portals are richly decorated with sculpture. The western portico is masterwork consisting of three portals: the central one consecrated to the Virgin, the left one dedicated to San Gil and the right one to the Final Judgement and Saint James.

Nowadays it is being restored within the project of the Santa Maria Cathedral Foundation, which manages guided tours and is in charge of restoration works.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

N. G. (6 months ago)
Amazing guided visit!
Justin Osemwota (16 months ago)
From far away you can see the great building, like the guiding star of the Wise Men, sitting on a hill. Alas! "The beauty of Israel is slain upon thy high places: how are the mighty fallen! // Tell it not in Gath, publish it not in the streets of Askelon; lest the daughters of the Philistines rejoice, lest the daughters of the uncircumcised triumph." Ref. 2Samuel, 1 : 19 & 20.
koldo rey (17 months ago)
Really nice activity. As far as I know, it's the only cathedral where you can visit from the bottom to the top, through places that are not usually opened for the people... Really different from other tipycal church visits, and highly recommendable
Mark Dadson (18 months ago)
Beautiful cathedral, amazing restoration work being done to save this building
Roses Andflour (2 years ago)
Gorgeous and oddly touching. I don’t know if the tone is the same for every audio-guide, the one in French certainly was. A must-see for art history lovers and normal people too x)
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