Veleia was a Roman town in Hispania. It was an important station on the Roman road ab Asturica Burdigalam that ran parallel to the coast of the Bay of Biscay. At its apogee, the city could have been inhabited by some five to ten thousand people, and apparently went through different cycles of prosperity and decline into the Early Middle Ages until it was finally abandoned.

The archaeological site of Iruña-Veleia is the most important from the Roman period in the Basque Country. It was alleged to contain the oldest known texts written in the Basque language as well as, allegedly, the oldest representation of the crucifixion of Jesus found to date, but later it was said that the findings were forgeries. Other authors favored their genuinely ancient provenance, in agreement with the stratigraphic dating performed by the archaeologists who made the discoveries.

The town was founded in the 8th century BC, in the Late Bronze Age. The houses from this period, rectangular and round with adobe walls and thatched roofs, are similar to those found at the nearby site of Atxa (Vitoria).

In the first half of the 1st century some of these houses were replaced by others of Roman style (domus). This architectural romanization continued as the century advanced.

The late Roman city (3rd and 4th centuries) is better known. It shows signs of decay and the construction of a wall that encloses an eleven hectare area. The town survived into the 5th century after Roman power had disappeared from the region, but by the end of the century only burial plots in abandoned buildings are found.

There was an abbey at the site at least since the 16th century whose buildings remained visible until the mid 19th century.

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Founded: 1st century AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Spain

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en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Carolina f (15 months ago)
Phenomenal site for making profitable public money craft jobs.
Marcos Habana (17 months ago)
Excellent place to learn stories and walk in a family with a wonderful view
Adadgisa Santos (17 months ago)
It looks very interesting but it was closed, another time we will return
Miriam Garcia (2 years ago)
Very interesting site. It is recommended to go with the guided tour to have a greater context of what each excavation is (currently they have Saturdays at 12 o'clock and you have to call by phone to reserve - visit the web). Much remains to be excavated.
Anton and Carol Digon (3 years ago)
Interesting visit. Great potential for new archaeological finds.
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