Llandaff Cathedral s an Anglican cathedral and parish church in Llandaff, Cardiff. The current building was constructed in the 12th century on the site of an earlier church. Severe damage was done to the church in 1400 during the rebellion of Owain Glyndŵr, during the English Civil War when it was overrun by Parliamentarian troops, and during the Great Storm of 1703.

By 1717, the damage to the cathedral was so extensive that the church seriously considered the removal of the see. Following further storms in the early 1720s, construction of a new cathedral began in 1734, designed by John Wood, the Elder. During the Cardiff Blitz of the Second World War in January 1941, the cathedral was severely damaged when a parachute mine was dropped; blowing the roof off the nave, south aisle and chapter house. The stonework which remains from the medieval period is primarily Somerset Dundry stone, though local blue lias constitutes most of the stonework done in the post-Reformation period. The work done on the church since World War II is primarily concrete and Pennant sandstone, and the roofs, of Welsh slate and lead, were added during the post-war rebuilding.

For many years, the cathedral had the traditional Anglican choir of boys and men, and more recently a girls' choir, with the only dedicated choir school in the Church in Wales, the Cathedral School, Llandaff. The cathedral contains a number of notable tombs, including Dubricius, a 6th-century British saint who evangelised Ergyng (now Archenfield) and much of South-East Wales, Meurig ap Tewdrig, King of Gwent, Teilo, a 6th-century Welsh clergyman, church founder and saint, and many Bishops of Llandaff, from the 7th century Oudoceus to the 19th century Alfred Ollivant, who was bishop from 1849 to 1882.

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Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in United Kingdom

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Riad Ghanma (4 months ago)
It is a nice historical site, you feel peaceful inside, specifically while the good guy is playing music. I need to get a better camera
Robin Baker (4 months ago)
What a stunning, Beautiful place. Hidden in a valley surrounded by trees this is a beautiful building with an interior to take your breath away. Epstein's figure of Christ is amazing, but for me the most beautiful thing was the recently installed organ which spans the choir. Most definitely worth a visit.
Szymon Dybowski (5 months ago)
Great place to visit if you want to experience history. Old meeting new (traditionally placed altar with side benches for the most prominent members of the congregation transitioned into modern church setting with the priest facing the brethren). If you go off the side cemetery, you will find the old one that has not been maintained - the nature reclaiming the burial grounds, in a sense closing the cycle of earthly existence...
Jon Turner (5 months ago)
One of the nicest cathedrals we have ever visited. The Epstein Christ is awesome. Also the Welch regiment Chapel is moving and interesting. The welcome we received from the volunteer was warm and friendly. Lovely village too. The car park (turning opposite Spar) gives 2 hours free parking. Enter the reg number and receive the free parking ticket but do not overstay.£100 fine! Burne Jones panels delightful too.
Yee (16 months ago)
What a beautiful cathedral. Open to public. Free to visit. Clean, well presented, peaceful. Not crowded. Lovely architecture and excellent preservation of historical artefacts. The grounds are beautifully maintained with plenty of parking nearby. A stone throw away from the river and bishops palace. Definitely worth a visit for families and tourists. Evening song weekly on Sundays.
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