Llandaff Cathedral s an Anglican cathedral and parish church in Llandaff, Cardiff. The current building was constructed in the 12th century on the site of an earlier church. Severe damage was done to the church in 1400 during the rebellion of Owain Glyndŵr, during the English Civil War when it was overrun by Parliamentarian troops, and during the Great Storm of 1703.

By 1717, the damage to the cathedral was so extensive that the church seriously considered the removal of the see. Following further storms in the early 1720s, construction of a new cathedral began in 1734, designed by John Wood, the Elder. During the Cardiff Blitz of the Second World War in January 1941, the cathedral was severely damaged when a parachute mine was dropped; blowing the roof off the nave, south aisle and chapter house. The stonework which remains from the medieval period is primarily Somerset Dundry stone, though local blue lias constitutes most of the stonework done in the post-Reformation period. The work done on the church since World War II is primarily concrete and Pennant sandstone, and the roofs, of Welsh slate and lead, were added during the post-war rebuilding.

For many years, the cathedral had the traditional Anglican choir of boys and men, and more recently a girls' choir, with the only dedicated choir school in the Church in Wales, the Cathedral School, Llandaff. The cathedral contains a number of notable tombs, including Dubricius, a 6th-century British saint who evangelised Ergyng (now Archenfield) and much of South-East Wales, Meurig ap Tewdrig, King of Gwent, Teilo, a 6th-century Welsh clergyman, church founder and saint, and many Bishops of Llandaff, from the 7th century Oudoceus to the 19th century Alfred Ollivant, who was bishop from 1849 to 1882.

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Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in United Kingdom

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Andrew Gale (10 months ago)
A magnificent cathedral and well worth a visit. Very pleasant grounds and location
David O'Callaghan (10 months ago)
Beautiful setting with a smattering of Cromwell's art, similar to works found at Reading abbey. Nice walks from the cemetery along the river.
William O'Connell (10 months ago)
Beautiful Building. A wonderful setting in which to give thanks and praise to the Lord our God
paul mollard (11 months ago)
Very impressive in its valley site. Wonderful architecture. Not open when I called so I must go again. No parking issues.
Madeleine La M. (13 months ago)
Absolutely must have to see ! Stunning architecture ! Love it .
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