Skinnskatteberg Manor

Skinnskatteberg, Sweden

The building of the manor house was begun in the 1770s by the iron master Wilhelm Hising. During the decades when the planning and building were in progress the outcome had been influenced by many styles and movements in art and architecture.

Hising´s son was also christened Wilhelm but was raised to the nobility and given the name Hisinger. He finished, decorated and furnished the Manor House and had a landscape garden laid out. He was a distinguished geologist and a scientist and had a laboratory built for himself. Until the turn of the century in 1900 the iron making was the principal industry at Skinnskatteberg. The Manor then belonged to the ironworks.

The Industrial area with its forges and workers´ dwellings were located behind the manor house and its adjacent buildings. Here streamed the water from the lakes Övre and Nedre Vättern and furnished the ironworks with water power.

During the 20th century Skinnskatteberg turned into a centre for the forest industry and in 1944 the Forest Warden School was located at the manor.

Today self-guided tour are always accessible. Workers dwellings are on the other side of the rapid.

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Details

Founded: 1770s
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Sweden
Historical period: The Age of Liberty (Sweden)

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