Engelsberg Ironworks

Fagersta, Sweden

Engelsberg Ironworks in Västmanland was constructed in 1681 and developed into one of the world's most modern ironworks in the period 1700-1800. The property comprises the mansion and park, works offices, workers' homes, and industrial buildings. Engelsberg is the only ironworks in Sweden that still preserves the buildings and most of the technical equipment. Engelsberg Ironworks was inscribed on the World Heritage List in 1993.

Iron production at Engelsberg goes back to the Middle Ages, when mine-owning farmers achieved efficiency in the use of the natural riches of the Bergslagen area. It was in the 18th century, however, that Engelsberg could definitely be ranked among the most important ironworks in Sweden and Europe. The works, which was ultramodern for its time, extracted and worked iron. The ore came from the Bergslagen mines, while the charcoal, which was crucial for heating the material, came from nearby forests.

Engelsberg Ironworks eventually consisted of about fifty different buildings. Besides the log-insulated smelting house and the hammer forge there is also a weighing house where the charcoal and ore were weighed. In the day workers' building, or the "inn" as it was also called, those who worked by the day could buy spirits and find accommodation. In 1917 a Lancashire forge with a rolling mill was built. The property also comprises two works offices, the gardener's house, slagstone towers, the grain store, workers' housing, and the byre. Engelsberg Ironworks is largely preserved as it looked after the last rebuilding in 1870. Particularly unique features are the blast furnace and the forge where the waterwheel, crusher, blower, and hammer still work.

For most of the eighteenth century Engelsberg Ironworks was owned by the Söderhielm family and in the nineteenth century by the Timm family. The works was sold in 1916 to Consul General Axel Ax:son Johnson, who put it under the administration of Avesta Ironworks. Three years later operations ceased. Engelsberg Ironworks is now owned by Nordstjernan AB, who restored the property in the 1970s with the aid of the National Heritage Board. In summer Engelsberg Ironworks is open to the public.

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Details

Founded: 1681
Category: Industrial sites in Sweden
Historical period: Swedish Empire (Sweden)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Uncle Chris (2 years ago)
Engelberg Bruk is a UNESCO heritage site that used to be the location of Engelsberg Ironworks; a very successful steel factory in the 17th century. Today, it has been restored by its owners and is now one of Sweden 's most prestigious countryside retreat.
PLAT STEPHANE (2 years ago)
I went on the website, no information. I asked by email for the schedule of the guided tour, I'm still waiting. We went directly on site, there were no indication and the main attraction was under repair. avoid it until they change their practice
Tomáš Fialka (2 years ago)
Nice and interesting place. Highly recommend...
Vincenzo Calvo (2 years ago)
English indications are lacking. The photo shows the only advice that foreign tourists can find. Many buildings are private. The main building seem to be under restoration. What a pity!
Edvin Erikson (2 years ago)
Fantastic place to visit. For those that like historical industry's or just want to see something really massive, this is the place. Beatuiful areas and soroundings. On the summers you can go by railbus from Ängelsberg to Kärrgurvan every Sunday to see even more historical areas.
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