Verla is a well-preserved 19th century mill village and a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1996. The first groundwood mill at Verla was founded in 1872 by Hugo Nauman but was destroyed by fire in 1876. A larger groundwood and board mill, founded in 1882 by Gottlieb Kreidl and Louis Haenel, continued to operate until 1964.

The Verla groundwood and board mill and its associated habitation are an outstanding and remarkably well-preserved example of the small-scale rural industrial settlement associated with pulp, paper and board production that flourished in northern Europe and North America in the 19th and early 20th centuries, of which only a handful survive.

Verla museum is open for visitors from May to September, but the larger World Heritage Site area can be explored around the year.

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Address

Verlantie, Kouvola, Finland
See all sites in Kouvola

Details

Founded: 1872-1882
Category: Industrial sites in Finland
Historical period: Russian Grand Duchy (Finland)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Markku Miettinen (2 years ago)
Didn't go to museum, didn't really feel like it would be anything for my taste. Atmosphere in here is nice though. For eating, the food offering is very limited and it's not the best I've eaten. Shortly said, it's just an old mill in the middle of finnish nature, with a few fancy old buildings around it. It's sort of nice, but not really special if you ask me.
Antti Laakso (2 years ago)
Unesco world heritage site. It's worth visiting. Interesting to see how cardboard was made in the 1920's Finland. Also you can learn more about wood processing.
Sonja Streit (2 years ago)
Best condition, perfect guide. We love it! Important to see
Vasilii Aleksandrov (2 years ago)
Nice museum. Here you can learn about old technologies in carton factory that was operative till 1964. Very interesting mechanical machines from 20th century. Photos are not allowed inside. Guided tours available in Finnish, English, Russian (English and Russian should be requested by phone or email). Price is reasonable (€10/adult)
Robin Bobin (2 years ago)
Nice place for interested in "old school" technologies -really old carton factory! Unfortunately to make picture inside is not allowed but you can see the factory in work on video and within a guided tour inside. Some pictures outside enclosed =)
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