The history of Anjala manor dates back to 17th century. Carl IX, the king of Sweden, donated it to Henrik Wrede’s widow in 1608 after Wrede had saved his life in Kirkholm battle. Henrik Wrede himself died in battle. Anjala manor was the residence of powerful Wrede family until 1837. The original main building was destroyed in a fire caused by Russian artillery in 1789 and the current one was built some years later.

The Anjala conspiracy of 1788 was signed in the manor. It was a scheme by disgruntled Swedish officers to end Gustav III's Russian War of 1788–90. Declaring Finland an independent state was part of the plot, although it is disputed what importance the conspirators connected to that aspect.

Anjala manor was opened to the public as a museum in 1957. The aim of the furnished rooms is to give a glimpse of late 18th to late 19th century period’s historical style and way of life. The manor also has a Mathilda Wrede room displaying items which are part of her life’s work.

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Details

Founded: ca. 1800
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Finland
Historical period: The Age of Enlightenment (Finland)

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