Monastery of Fitero

Fitero, Spain

The Monastery of Fitero is a Cistercian monastery located at Fitero, on the banks of the Alhama river.

It was founded, on a different site, in 1141 as part of the Cistercian expansion into Spain from the center at Escaladieu Abbey, and moved to Fitero in 1152. Durand was its first abbot, followed by St. Raymond of Fitero, who later founded the Order of Calatrava.

The floor plan of the church is similar to that in the monasteries of Clairvaux and Pontigny, a Latin cross plan with three naves, the ambulatory sanctuary with five side chapels.

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Details

Founded: 1141
Category: Religious sites in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

ana anton ausejo (4 months ago)
Impresionante.No esperas encontrar una joya así tan poco conocida. Muy bien conservado/restaurado. La guía da una explicación muy clara de lo principal, aunque sería deseable que la visita durara un poco más, dada la riqueza del monasterio. La audición del órgano es impresionante.
Johanna Godoy (2 years ago)
Its history and architecture is impressive
Jose Luis Perez (2 years ago)
Expectacular
Pauline Njeri (3 years ago)
Nice building
Francisco narvaez pazos (3 years ago)
Expectacular
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