Tosterup Castle

Tomelilla, Sweden

The tower of Tosterup Castle was built in the 1400s and the main building date from the 1500s. The present appearance is date mainly from the restoration made in 1760s, when the tower was merged to the main building. The castle has been owned by several famous noble families like Brahe, Thott and Krabbe.

Today Tosterup is owned by family Ehrensvärd and in private use.

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Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Sweden
Historical period: Kalmar Union (Sweden)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Inger Englund (2 years ago)
En historisk plats , i full nutida verksamhet. Promenera i miljön. Tänk på att det är privat mark.
Morgan Olsson (2 years ago)
Vackert slott
Pavel Racek (2 years ago)
Malebný soukromý zámeček, obklopený vodou na kopci, kolem funkční hospodářství, vinice. Přístupná jen část parku.
Jonas Lundin (2 years ago)
Very nice castle and beautiful sorroundings.
Filip Alpsten (3 years ago)
Fint ställe, fränt med vallgrav runt slottet, andra fina byggnader också!
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