St. Nicholas' Church

Simrishamn, Sweden

St. Nicholas" Church chancel dates from the 1100s and the nave was added during the next century. The church was originally a chapel for fishermen, and as the town has expanded, has been built on substantially. The finely carved pulpit dates from 1626 and is believed to be the work of Claus Clausen Billedsnider.

References:
  • Marianne Mehling et al. Knaurs Kulturführer in Farbe. Schweden. München 1987.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Giorgio Berardi (10 months ago)
What a precious little gem S:t Nikolai is! Its shape is definitely odd, a testimony to subsequent additions (and the odd destruction). On the day we visited, a confirmation ceremony was coming to an end, and it was good to see modern life breathed into this ancient structure. Also, we appreciated the model ships hanging inside the church as a reminder of the close connection between religion and sea-faring customs in days gone by.
Maria Vasileva (11 months ago)
Come and see
Ankit Poddar (2 years ago)
A very very old architecture that's visible from the outside structure. Interiors are renovated, good to visit if you are nearby.
Hadi Gelan (3 years ago)
Amazing
Lars Karlsson (3 years ago)
Nice church, beautiful esthetics
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