Bornholm Museum

Rønne, Denmark

The Bornholm Museum is a museum located in Rønne. The museum gives a history of Rønne and the island of Bornholm, dating from the Paleolithic era to the modern age, including the history of occupied Bornholm during World War II. The museum houses a number of Nordic Bronze Age and Iron Age artifacts relating to the island and uses a Mjolnir, discovered in Bornholm, but now housed in the National Museum of Denmark), as its logo.

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Category: Museums in Denmark

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

M W (2 years ago)
quite nice sailboat atmosphere under the rooftop
katarzyna boczkowska (2 years ago)
In Poland are most interesting places for visits.
Elias D S Caballero (2 years ago)
The Danish island of Bornholm in the Baltic Sea has turned up a cache of treasures - over 300 carved stones, dating back to the Stone Age. They're called "sunstones" ("solsten" in Danish), and they were found at a Stone Age archaeological site on the island called Vasagård, which has been puzzling archaeologists for years.
Luxor Liric (2 years ago)
Small museum but worth to see. Especially when you start to explore this beautiful island.
Václav Kubaljak (3 years ago)
Small but nice museum witch describe history od Brnholm from stone age to modern era. There is also really nice Viking age presentation.
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