The history of the Sjundby manor castle dates back to year 1417. The present main building was built in the 1560’s by Jakob Henriksson. It was made of grey stone and had also a defensive purpose. Sjundby has been a residence for several noble families. The most well-known owner was Sigfrid Wasa, the daugher of the king Eric XIV. After her Adlercreutz family had owned Sjundby over 300 years to the present. Only exception was in 1944-1956, when the Porkkala area was rent to Russians and used as a garrison.

Sjundby is one of the finest stone buildings in Finland. The castle is in private possession but is also open to visitors (contact info@seaction.com).

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Details

Founded: ca. 1560
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Finland
Historical period: Reformation (Finland)

Rating

3.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

xWood4000 - (4 years ago)
Muista varaa aika opastukseen. Tosi hieno paikka.
Alexander Su (4 years ago)
It os rathe nise place. Nature enviroment is atractive. But there is not very impressive exibition for travel from Helsinki.
Goran Fagerstedt (4 years ago)
Intressant historisk plats! Fin guidning.
Juha K (4 years ago)
Nice surrounding
Heimo Hänninen (5 years ago)
Nice scenics but no service. Bring your own food.
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