Örebro Castle

Örebro, Sweden

For over 700 years Örebro Castle has kept a watchful eye on everyone crossing the bridge on the River Svartån. The oldest part of the castle, a defence tower, was erected in the latter half of the 13th century. This tower was added to in the 14th century to make a larger stronghold. The castle was expanded during the reign of the royal family Vasa between 1573-1627 to the impressive Renaissance castle.

After Vasa family Örebro castle was left to decay, but the main restoration took place in 1758-1764 by Carl Johan Crondstedt. After him the castle was used as a residence of county governor. The castle was finally restored to the 16th century appearance between 1897-1900.

Today there are guided tours, an exhibition centre and the castle is a very worthwhile sightseeing destination.

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Address

Kansligatan 3, Örebro, Sweden
See all sites in Örebro

Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Gábor Dániel Szelley (18 months ago)
Very beautiful, interesting place but i couldnt find a great swedish restaurant in that area.
Sivakumar Annadurai (2 years ago)
Beautifully maintained and it's very well lighted from outside. Heard that it's a restaurant now inside. But it looks great at the river side.
Sissara Chansiri (2 years ago)
It's so beautiful. I got a lot of pretty pics around the castle area. It's worth to come. Örebro is a cute city. I really feel impressed.
D Wasem (2 years ago)
Really nice water castle / palace. Small, but interesting museum about it's history. Depending on the time of year open for guided tours only on the weekend. Nice park around.
Gionatan Torricelli (2 years ago)
Very original building that had a central position on the ancient history of the Sweden. The visit of the castle, its garden and the center of the city can be done easily in one morning. It should be visited if traveling from one side to another of the Sweden.
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