Karlslund Manor

Örebro, Sweden

Originally, in the 16th century, the site of the Manor House and gardens was used for royal farm buildings and Karlslund was mainly concerned with agriculture. The present Karlslund Manor House was built between 1804 and 1809 by Christian Günther. In 1819 a later owner, Carl Anckarsvärd, had the manor house rebuilt and altered to the appearance we know today. The architect behind this work was the famous Carl Christopher Gjörwell, who also furnished the upper storey of the manor house and laid out the beautiful park. Gjörwell also had the Stora Salongen (Grand Saloon) decorated with rare French panorama wallpapers. These show the most important ports of France and were hand-printed c. 1800. They are among the oldest rolled wallpapers extant in Sweden.

There are several cultural history displays and museums at Karlslund like the Statare Museum, power station (1897) and old mill. Today Karlslund Manor House is used as a restaurant and conference centre. Here one can book Sunday lunches, Christmas dinners, and so on. In the summer there is also a pleasant café on the terrace.

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Details

Founded: 1804-1809
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Sweden
Historical period: The Age of Enlightenment (Sweden)

More Information

www.orebro.se

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Nicklas Carlsson (2 years ago)
Fint ställe, extra trevligt är med deras grillplatser och skyltarna med all historia.
Barbro Delin (2 years ago)
Mycket vacker gård med trevlig restaurang och julmarknad
Marcilene Karlsson (2 years ago)
I Love this place!
Rami Deeb (2 years ago)
so awesome garden
Kristian Tigersjäl (3 years ago)
My favorite place in Örebro. Fantastic nature walks. Be sure to walk the trail that tells the history of the area.
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