St. Nicholas’ Church

Örebro, Sweden

The building of three-nave stone church dedicated to St. Nicholas was started in the late 1200s, but not completed until mid-1300s. The western tower was erected in the 15th century. Engelbrekt Engelbrektsson, a Swedish rebel leader against Kalmar Union and later statesman, was probably buried to the church after he was murdered in 1436.

The church was restored in 1860-1899. The appearance has been influenced by English and German Gothic architecture styles. The interior date mainly from the 17th century.

References:
  • Marianne Mehling et al. Knaurs Kulturführer in Farbe. Schweden. München 1987.

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: Late 1200s
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

More Information

www.tripadvisor.com

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Profesor Wiktor (19 months ago)
Śwetna atmosfera. Przepiękny ołtarz i organy.
Johan Watz (19 months ago)
En fin och trevligt kyrka av det större slaget. Vi var där på en julkonsert och akustiken var bra.
Birgitta Aversjö (2 years ago)
En lugn och skön plats.
Ing-Marie Jansson (2 years ago)
Det är en väldigt vacker kyrka med anor sedan 1200-talet, men den är också tidlös. Det finns ett rikt utbud av musik i kyrkan!!
George On tour (2 years ago)
St. Nicolai Church is located at Stortorget in central Örebro and meets thousands of people each week. Some enter the church to light a candle, others to visit Café Nikolai and our popular children's activities, we have a rich and big youth and confirmation work and a wonderful music and worship service.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Hluboká Castle

Hluboká Castle (Schloss Frauenberg) is considered one of the most beautiful castles in the Czech Republic. In the second half of the 13th century, a Gothic castle was built at the site. During its history, the castle was rebuilt several times. It was first expanded during the Renaissance period, then rebuilt into a Baroque castle at the order of Adam Franz von Schwarzenberg in the beginning of the 18th century. It reached its current appearance during the 19th century, when Johann Adolf II von Schwarzenberg ordered the reconstruction of the castle in the romantic style of England's Windsor Castle.

The Schwarzenbergs lived in Hluboká until the end of 1939, when the last owner (Adolph Schwarzenberg) emigrated overseas to escape from the Nazis. The Schwarzenbergs lost all of their Czech property through a special legislative Act, the Lex Schwarzenberg, in 1947.

The original royal castle of Přemysl Otakar II from the second half of the 13th century was rebuilt at the end of the 16th century by the Lords of Hradec. It received its present appearance under Count Jan Adam of Schwarzenberg. According to the English Windsor example, architects Franz Beer and F. Deworetzky built a Romantic Neo-Gothic chateau, surrounded by a 1.9 square kilometres English park here in the years 1841 to 1871. In 1940, the castle was seized from the last owner, Adolph Schwarzenberg by the Gestapo and confiscated by the government of Czechoslovakia after the end of World War II. The castle is open to public. There is a winter garden and riding-hall where the Southern Bohemian gallery exhibitions have been housed since 1956.