Tidö is one of Sweden's best preserved Baroque palaces, built in the Dutch Renaissance style. The first building on the site was a medieval house built by the Gren family in the 15th century. In 1537, the Gren family sold the castle to the Queen consort, Margaret Leijonhufvud. In 1540, her husband, king Gustav Vasa, traded the castle to Ekolsund Castle and Tidö came to the Tott family. Today, minor ruins of the former house can be found next to the present building.

The present castle at Tidö was built by the Lord High Chancellor of Sweden Axel Oxenstierna in 1625–1645. The castle was built around a rectangular courtyard with the main building to the north and the three linked wings to the east, west and south. The main entrance is through a vault in the south wing. In 1889, the von Schinkel family bought Tidö and they still own it today. Today visitors may see the Toy Museum.

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Details

Founded: 1625-1645
Category: Castles and fortifications in Sweden
Historical period: Swedish Empire (Sweden)

Rating

3.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Amir Wilf (2 years ago)
This house is beautiful with it's surroundings to just stroll around - be advised, going into the house itself is possible on specific dates and times which are listed in their website. Also, they only accept enrty fees with Swish
Nanni P. (2 years ago)
Quiet, calm and peaceful place not so much to see there.
Linda Igvegbe (2 years ago)
Nice, quiet place for walks. Also deers walking around. Nice nature
Kevin Sorensen (3 years ago)
A nice place with great views
Md. Tanbhir Hoq (4 years ago)
nice place for a afternoon stroll.
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